How to avoid deer tick bites and Lyme Disease

Deer ticks are carriers of Lyme Disease
Deer ticks are carriers of Lyme Disease

The season is here when we all start heading outdoors for camping, hiking, mountain biking and other outdoor activities that could bring us eye-to-eye with deer ticks, that nasty little bug that brings with it Lyme Disease.

May is Lyme Disease Awareness month and a good time to share information about staying protected from ticks in the coming spring/summer months. Lyme disease has now become one of the fastest growing epidemics to date. The CDC estimates the number of cases in the US to be about 300,000 cases a year.

Here are a few good things to know in order to stay protected.

TOP TEN FACTS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT TICKS

10. Ticks crawl up Ticks don’t jump, fly, or drop from trees onto your head and back. If you find one attached there, it most likely latched onto your foot or leg and crawled up over your entire body.

9. Ticks come in small, medium and large sizes

8. Ticks can be active even in the winter and are not killed by freezing temperatures.

7. Ticks carry disease-causing microbes and tick-transmitted infections are more common these days than in past decades when tick bites were an annoyance but now are more likely to make you sick.

6. Only deer ticks transmit Lyme disease bacteria. The only way to get Lyme disease is by being bitten by a deer tick.

5. For most tick-borne diseases, you have at least 24 hours to find and remove a feeding tick before it transmits an infection Even a quick daily tick check at bath or shower time can be helpful in finding and removing attached ticks before they can transmit an infection. Lyme disease bacteria take at least 24 hours to invade the tick’s saliva.

4. Deer tick nymphs look like a poppy seed on your skin. They’re easy to miss, their bites are generally painless, and they have a habit of climbing up (under clothing) and biting in hard-to-see places.

3. The easiest and safest way to remove a tick is with pointy tweezers. Grab the ticks right down next to the skin. The next step is to simply pull the tick out like a splinter.

2. Clothing with built-in tick repellent is best for preventing tick bites An easy way to avoid tick bites and disease is to wear clothing (shoes, socks, shorts or pants, and shirt) with Insect Shield® tick repellent built-in.
1. Tick bites and tick-borne diseases are completely preventable. There is really only one way you get a tick-transmitted disease and that’s from a tick bite. Reducing tick abundance in your yard, wearing tick repellent clothing every day, treating pets every month and getting into a habit of doing a quick body scan are all great actions for preventing tick bites.

Insect Shield Tick Repellent Apparel Insect Shield’s EPA-registered technology converts clothing and gear into effective and convenient insect protection. The repellency is long-lasting and appropriate for use by the entire family with no restrictions for use.

Products include apparel, gear and even equestrian and pet products.

Quick Facts:
• Repellency is in the clothing and gear – not on your skin
• Lasts through 70 launderings
• No restrictions for use
• Appropriate for the entire family
• No need to re-apply
• Repels mosquitoes, ticks, ants, flies, chigger and midges including those that can cause Lyme disease, malaria and other dangerous insect-borne diseases.

For more RVing articles and tips take a look at my Healthy RV Lifestyle website, where you will also find my ebooks: 111 Ways to Get the Biggest Bang for your RV Lifestyle Buck (PDF or Kindle), BOONDOCKING: Finding a Perfect Campsite on America’s Public Lands (PDF or Kindle), Snowbird Guide to Boondocking in the Southwestern Deserts (PDF or Kindle), The RV Lifestyle: Reflections of Life on the Road (Kindle reader version), and my newest Boondockbob’s Guide to RV Boondocking (Kindle). NOTE: Use the Kindle version to read on iPad and iPhone or any device that has the free Kindle reader app.

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